Archive for the tag 'H-1B Transfer'

H-1B Benched, Underpaid, Feeling Exploited? Issues to Consider Before You Quit

H-1B workers who are benched or underpaid not only feel financially exploited, they may also feel emotionally exploited, especially if they have an employer whose main motivation tactic is to threaten to revoke your visa. Understandably, H-1B workers who feel exploited and unappreciated will want to quit their job, and may do so in the […]

Afraid You’ll Be Fired and Lose Your Status if You Complain to Your H-1B Employer? The Law May Protect You

H-1B employees who have been benched without pay or underpaid often are reluctant to complain against their employers because they fear they will be fired and lose their immigration status. This fear is understandable, but exaggerated. This article will explain why complaining can actually help preserve your status in the United States. The Relationship Between […]

Complaining About H-1B Employer Benching May Give You the Tool to Salvage Your Status

We hear from many H-1B holders who have been benched or underpaid, but who think it’s best if they first find a new job, return to school, or obtain some other status to enable them to stay in the United States before they complain about their H-1B employer who underpaid them or violated the law. The reality […]

Is Your Employer Benching You and Offering Fake Paystubs? Don’t Take Them! There Are Other (Lawful) Options

We see the same cycle with some H-1B employers: (1) they bench an H-1B worker without pay; (2) the worker understandably wants to transfer to a new employer who pays him; and (3) the benching employer offers the worker fake paystubs, to “help” the worker transfer. If YOU find yourself in this situation, do NOT […]

Common Assumptions by H-1B Workers that Are Wrong

Image via Wikipedia Many underpaid H-1B workers make assumptions about their situation that (while understandable)  are incorrect. Below are several assumptions we have heard from H-1B employees that are wrong.  If you have been making the assumptions below, you may be stopping yourself from improving your situation.

FAQ: I’ve Been Benched and Have No Pay Stubs. Can I Change My H-1B Visa?

Image by mirsasha via Flickr Question 1: I’m an H-1B employee and I have benched without pay, but I have found a new employer. I have no pay stubs. Can I “transfer” without leaving the U.S.? Question 2: I’m an H-1B employee and I was benched without pay, but when I complained, my employer fired […]

Benched or Underpaid H-1B Wages? The Importance of Acting Promptly

Image via Wikipedia If you’re an H-1B worker who has been benched or otherwise underpaid wages, and you’re interested in trying to address your problems, you should consider acting promptly.  Promptly educate yourself about the legal options you have, and promptly take action.  If you take take the right actions at the wrong time (i.e. […]

Learn ALL About Your H-1B Rights Before You Give Your Employer An Earful About Them

On various occasions we have received calls from H-1B workers who became aware of various legal rights (e.g. right to file a wage complaint with Department of Labor) from information they found on the internet (e.g. DOL’s website pages about H-1B wage rights). While it is a great thing to educate yourself, please do not make the […]

H-1B Employee Tip: Severance Offer? Consider These Things

If you are an H-1B employee, and your employer is terminating your job and has offered you a severance agreement, you should consider the following things. (Please note this post does not provide legal advice- if you want legal advice, you should contact an attorney and discuss your specific severance agreement and circumstances).

When H-1B Employment Trouble Arises, Start Work on Plan B Immediately

Does your H-1B employer: Rip you off (e.g. make you pay H-1B filing fees, underpay your wages, etc.)? Subject you to abuse (e.g. threaten you with job termination or deportation)? Want you to do things that you think are unethical? If you answered ‘yes’ to one or more of these questions, then you may well […]